Posts

A .22 caliber pistol, like the Smith & Wesson SW22, is a good weapon for a beginner. But unfortunately, sometimes beginners get a head of themselves and go right for a more powerful gun like a 9mm Glock 17 gen 5 (we have guide rods for this and many other Glocks).

So, let’s say a beginner comes to you and wants to work with his or her 9mm or .40 caliber pistol. Well, you can still step down for starters to a .22. But your student will probably want to shoot his or her 9mm or .40 caliber blaster. 

In a lightweight polymer subcompact or pocket semi-automatic pistol such as a Smith & Wesson Shield in 9mm or .40 caliber, a Smith & Wesson SD9, a Sig Sauer P365 9mm, or a Sig Sauer P938, this spells substantial R-E-C-O-I-L.

Guide rods are an essential element of most semi-automatic pistols. However, the guide rods that come with the handguns just mentioned in the factory box are made of plastic. This can present several disadvantages such as improper oiling, springs that are too tight, and overuse. Problems that can arise as a result are excess wear and tear on the pistol which can cause malfunctions. Additionally, springs that are too tight can increase recoil.

That’s why we make stainless steel guide rods for the above pistols as well as for a multitude of other pistols including the Sig Sauer SP2022, Smith & Wesson® Shield .45 caliber, Walther PPQ-M2 St, Smith & Wesson® SD40VE, Beretta 92FS Compact and M9A1, HK VP9, CZ 75 compact, CZ p07, CZ p10, and the CZ pcr.

The heft of a stainless-steel guide rod dampens a pistols recoil – and that’s a good thing for the beginning shooter. So, if you are working with a new handgun owner or a beginning shooter, consider giving the gift of an American-made stainless steel guide rod to replace the plastic one that comes with the gun.